Patriot’s Day – April 19, 1775

“Stand your ground; don’t fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here.”

Militia Captain John Parker, April 19th, 1775, the battle of Lexington, “the Shot Heard Round the World”

“The Lord is a God that loveth righteousness and hateth inequity, in whatever shape or character it appears. Injustice, oppression and violence (much less the shedding of innocent blood) shall not pass unnoticed by the just Governor of the world…

The truth of these sentiments hath often been verified in providence, and the proudest princes and the most powerful states have been taught by severe, by fatal experience, that desolation from the Lord awaits the impiety of those who do violence to His people and ‘shed innocent blood in their land.'”

(“The Fate of Blood-Thirsty Oppressors and God’s Tender Care of His Distressed People” by Rev. Jonas Clark, 1776. A sermon and eyewitness narrative of the “Shot heard round the world” at the Battle of Lexington, 1775)

“Today, April 19, is rightly identified as “Patriots’ Day.” In truth, April 19, 1775, should be regarded as important a date to Americans as July 4, 1776. It’s a shame that we don’t celebrate Patriots’ Day as enthusiastically as we do Independence Day. It’s even more shameful that many Americans don’t even remember what happened on this day back in 1775.

This was the day the “shot heard ’round the world” was fired. It was the day America’s War for Independence began.

Being warned of approaching British troops by Dr. Joseph Warren (who dispatched Paul Revere and William Dawes to Lexington and Concord with the news), Pastor Jonas Clark alerted his congregants at the Church of Lexington that the British army was on its way to seize the colonists’ weapons and to arrest Sam Adams and John Hancock. Both of these men had taken refuge in Pastor Clark’s home with about a dozen of the pastor’s armed men guarding the house. Other men from the congregation (around 75-80 in number) stood with their muskets on Lexington Green when over 800 British troops appeared before them at barely the break of day. The militia commander, Jonas Parker, told his fellow colonists, “Don’t fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here.”

According to eyewitnesses, British soldiers opened fire on the militiamen without warning (the British command to disperse and the British soldiers’ opening salvo of gunfire were simultaneous), immediately killing eight of the colonists (including Parker), of whom at least seven were Pastor Clark’s parishioners. In self-defense, the Minutemen took cover and returned fire. These were the first shots of the Revolutionary War.

Again, this took place on Lexington Green, which was located in the shadow of the church house where those men worshipped each Sunday. The men that were guarding Adams and Hancock escorted them out of harm’s way shortly before the troops arrived. Without a doubt, the heroic efforts of Pastor Clark and his brave Minutemen at the Church of Lexington saved the lives of Sam Adams and John Hancock. And eight of those brave men gave their lives protecting two men who became two of America’s greatest Founding Fathers. But, mind you, Jonas Clark and his men are as important to the story of America’s independence as any of our Founding Fathers.

According to Pastor Clark, these are the names of the eight men who died on Lexington Green on that fateful April morning: Robert Munroe, Jonas Parker, Samuel Hadley, Jonathan Harrington, Jr., Isaac Muzzy, Caleb Harrington, and John Brown, all of Lexington, and one Mr. Porter of Woburn.

By the time the British troops arrived at the Concord Bridge, hundreds of colonists had amassed a defense of the bridge. A horrific battle took place, and the British troops were routed and soon retreated back to Boston. America’s War for Independence had begun.

Yes, ladies and gentlemen, these two elements of our history are lost to the vast majority of Americans today: 1) it was attempted gun confiscation by the British troops that ignited America’s War for Independence, and 2) it was a pastor and the men of his congregation that mostly comprised the “Minutemen” who fired the shots that started our great Revolution.”

Note by Pastor Baldwin, Liberty Fellowship church in Montana
  1. “The Fate of Blood-Thirsty Oppressors and God’s Tender Care of His Distressed People” by Rev. Jonas Clark, 1776. A sermon and eyewitness narrative of the “Shot heard round the world” at the Battle of Lexington, 1775


Never Again!

“Israel will mark Yom HaShoah, its annual Holocaust Remembrance Day to honor the six million Jews who perished in the Holocaust. Most Israelis are aware that it is held on the anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising of April 1943, which took place during the feast of unleavened bread, and marked yet another difficult Passover in Jewish history.”
https://us.icej.org/news/headlines/when-god-says-never-again


Safety and Security – Duty to Protect

Militia: an army composed of citizens… called up in time of emergency. (Webster’s 2010)

There are four places in the American Constitution that affirm the Militia’s prior existence, and no law can alter it. The militia is all able bodied members of a community.

Article I, Section 8, Clauses 15 & 16:

[The Congress shall have Power To…]

Clause 15: [ ] “To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;”

Clause 16: [ ] “To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;”

Article II, Section 2, Clause 1:

“The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States…”

AMENDMENT II

A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.

Safety and Security – Duty to Protect

Barmen: the Church then and now

Tom introduces listeners to the Barmen Declaration of 1934. He then helps listeners understand what genuine resistance to the Nazis looked like at the time, and how many German churches had been coopted by cultural trends.
In our ideological age, cut off from both nature and nature’s God, totalitarianisms emerge to fill in the empty spaces in our heads and hearts. Classical Christian theism is what we need today, but most evangelicals don’t know what that is.

Podcast: https://crosspolitic.com/podcast/the-theology-pugcast-the-barmen-declaration-saying-no-to-cultural-accommodation/

Here’s the wiki page for the Barmen Declaration–https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barmen_Declaration

Highlights/Outline of this Episode

The Barmen Declaration

1934 Germany, 139 delegates of the churches meet to declare the true aligence of the church and encourage resistance to false allegiances and the political evil of national socialism. (Yes, socialism, the same godless ideology we are facing today in America.)

False allegiances

  • Turned from the true God
  • Political symptoms are related to the sickness of theological liberalism
  • Theological liberalism is embraced in order to make the church more relevant, attractive
  • Resulted in “domesticated,” “accommodating,” and effeminate church

Resistance to evil

  • Godly relevance (truth) is not always popular
  • The movement started from the Barmen declaration had to go underground
  • Grace and salvation give you the freedom to proclaim unpopular truths no matter the worldly consequences
  • Stop following the godless culture in order to be relevant
  • Build a Godly culture in the church and our households

Podcast: https://crosspolitic.com/podcast/the-theology-pugcast-the-barmen-declaration-saying-no-to-cultural-accommodation/

Socialism, Communism, Marxism https://ministry.family.blog/america/socialism-marxism-communism/

Socialism: Not a good idea

“In Washington, there’s a memorial to the victims of Communism. A statue depicting the goddess of Democracy holds a flame over an inscription reading

“To the more than 100 million victims of communism and those who love liberty.”

“For the past 170 years Socialism, the brainchild of Karl Marx and Fridrich Engels has been tried in its various forms around the world often followed by oppression, poverty, and failure...

Webster defines socialism as a system or society in which there’s no private property, where means of production are owned and controlled by the state and a transition between capitalism and communism...

“The first thing they do is to close down the churches. Close them up and eliminate if you will, eradicate, execute priests, pastors, sisters, nuns – people of faith,” Edwards tells CBN News.

Source

1. https://www1.cbn.com/cbnnews/us/2019/june/as-democrats-race-towards-socialism-experts-caution-this-has-been-tried-and-failed-in-every-way

Excerpt from Imprimis: Property Rights and Religious Liberty

“James Madison wrote an essay on property in 1792 in which he connects property rights to all human rights, including freedom of religion, speech, and the press. Madison defines property as ‘every thing to which a man may attach a value and have a right, and which leaves to every one else the like advantage‘ (emphasis in original)—the italicized words distinguish the natural rights of the Declaration of Independence from the kind of rights proclaimed by socialism, such as the right to a guaranteed income or to free education, which by definition make claims on the property of others…

Madison concludes: ‘In a word, as a man is said to have a right to his property, he may be equally said to have a property in his rights.’ … 

Knowing the horrors of modern war, Churchill hated and feared war all his life. Yet he made this speech to rally his cabinet, as he would rally the British nation, to war. Why? Because he was possessed of the knowledge of the nature of the human being—the fact that we are made in God’s image to confront the eternal questions from inside a mortal body, and that our rights to our property and our rights to conscience and religious liberty are aspects of the two parts that integrate to make the human being. Churchill thought the human being was a thing produced by nature and by God and that no man, not even Adolf Hitler with his vast divisions, could ever conquer that. He fought for that belief. I think we are going to have to fight for it too.”

Ref.

Property Rights and Religious Liberty
December 2015 • Volume 44, Number 12 • Larry P. Arnn, President, Hillsdale College
imprimis.hillsdale.edu/property-rights-and-religious-liberty/